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Posts Tagged ‘Family’

Crazy Rich Stereotypes

Crazy Rich Asians Trilogy (3 Book Series)In early fall 2018, a film based on the New York Times Bestseller, Crazy Rich Asians, will debut with an exclusive all-Asian cast. Similar to responses to the model minority myth, feedback from fellow Asians has varied. A question needing a response is whether ethnic exposure, however stereotypical or blatantly false, is ethical, or pragmatically superior to exhibiting nothing at all.

See the FaceBook conversation over this topic started under the group, “Progressive Asian-American Christians”

Elementary, My Dear Daughter

Our daughter’s summer birthdate forced us to choose whether to begin her educational career (kindergarten) a year earlier or later. I often lamented the ‘early entry’ decision over the years against my child’s objections that any delay would have given her a different set of unknown friends. I argued the extra year would have been better for her physical and emotional maturity.

Through much reflection and ribbing from my spouse, I now realize that the primary reason for waiting was so that I could have our daughter home with us one more year. While there is nothing wrong with this wish, it shows that the entire decision-making process needs more attention.

I wanted to delay the inevitable for these precious elementary school moments of time feel like sand slipping through my fingers.

The days are long but the years go by too fast.

Alex Kettles (former CRU Director, Oregon State University)

MTV’s Rev Run and Justine Simmons have encouraged families to save time by running their household like a business. Organizing the family according to a corporate model would pit our daughter as a stakeholder/employee having a compelling interest in the outcome and her parents as corporate executives. The kindergarten teacher acts as a mid-level manager as we concurrently are tax-paying shareholders of the public school system.

Current stakeholder theory holds that we have a morally significant non-fiduciary relationship with our daughter and that we should consider her needs (e.g. personality type, educational style, teacher qualifications, institutional quality, etc.) as well as our own. Our fiduciary interest demands proper consideration but pales in comparison. Holding my daughter back a year may make her more competitive in the marketplace or as a prospective college student in 12 years but the shareholder thesis that our primary social responsibility in our ‘familial’ corporation is to increase profits (à la an academic scholarship) seems relatively shortsighted.

As a parent or any leader in an organization, some decisions cater to other’s needs; many revolve around our own interests. Surfacing the multiple motivations behind a decision requires time. Despite the inevitable conflict, life often demands an immediate response and does not wait for an all-things-considered thoughtful reply. Fortunately, these crucial relationships are not about getting the correct answers but of managing the competing interests of all parties by asking the right questions about our motivations. Achieving this balance is not simple and may not be possible. Yet considering the various needs of stakeholders ultimately represents a fundamental elementary starting point in organizational management.

Film Recommendations: College Road Trip (2008); Father of the Bride (1991)