Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Children’

Crazy Rich Stereotypes

Crazy Rich Asians Trilogy (3 Book Series)In early fall 2018, a film based on the New York Times Bestseller, Crazy Rich Asians, will debut with an exclusive all-Asian cast. Similar to responses to the model minority myth, feedback from fellow Asians has varied. A question needing a response is whether ethnic exposure, however stereotypical or blatantly false, is ethical, or pragmatically superior to exhibiting nothing at all.

See the FaceBook conversation over this topic started under the group, “Progressive Asian-American Christians”

“Up” in the Air with Nail Houses

After a beautiful life and marriage cut short by his wife’s premature passing, Up (2009) depicts an elderly gentleman’s quest to fulfill his childhood “cross-my-heart” sweetheart promise to move to Paradise Falls in South America. Enter Russell: a young boy who is one “Be kind to the elderly” act away from earning his final badge toward becoming a Wilderness Explorer. Karl Frederickson has to continually choose between fulfilling personal desires and including Russell on his quest. Frederickson winds up discovering that the adventure doesn’t lie in the destination but in the journey. Frederickson’s nail house, which was so important to him at the beginning of the movie primarily because of its memories, gets appropriately left behind in his finding that life is never too late for new experiences. The fifth amendment of the United States Constitution generally protects private property from governmental seizure without “just compensation.” However, eminent domain (compulsory seizure for civil use, public safety, or economic development) allows the transfer of private property for the public interest in exchange for fair market value. Eminent domain represents a skirmish between individual property rights, public property, the common good, and private economic development.

The Constitution has traditionally been quite clear about public use, just compensation, and due process as prerequisites for eminent domain. But during contemporary times, Costco is a “public use”; just compensation is getting pennies on the dollar., and cities have offered owners nothing for their land, doing them “favors” to take it off their hands. So this is the world that we have come to. And how just did we get UP there?

Your Employer Will Be Watching

The Hunger Games’ Katniss Everdeen ‘chooses’ to fight in a mandatory made-for-reality battle of have nots. In the real-world, government agencies ask for social network passwords from prospective applicants with little to no resistance. Farces of freedom pervade both arenas of financial inequality.

The young movie heroine notes that even ‘the 99%’ have their pecking order and that weaknesses come with the privileges of money and status: “That the Careers [tributes] have been better fed growing up is actually to their disadvantage, because they don’t know how to be hungry.”

Yet well-off citizens in the two Capitols (with readily available consumer goods) maintain a competitive advantage to resist forms of their respective oppression. Panem children put their names a few extra times in the death lottery to feed their families; applicants on the lower end of the reality spectrum understand what it takes to survive but ‘willingly’ give up privacy rights in the process hoping for benefited positions. These modern human resource games (cf. the Roman Colosseum) illustrate the consequences of socioeconomic inequality in societies with too much time on their hands.

The American Civil Liberties Union criticized the authoritarian measures taken on FaceBook to protect national security and the corporate ethos. Freedom of privacy was temporarily restored by the stopgap of a collectively outraged public. Can anyone stop the consequences of economic disparity found in the Hunger Games and our real world? Does society . . . 5 . . . 4 . . . have time . . . 3 . . . 2 . . .for a sequel? . . . 1

 

Say it isn’t, Joe.

Ten years after the Enron Corporation was exposed for its massively systemic and cleverly-planned ongoing accounting fraud, the moral structure of college football is being shaken to its core at Penn State University.

Prospective institutional cover-up for act(s) of sexual abuse allegedly committed by head football coach Joe Paterno’s former defensive coordinator and charges of multiple subsequent infractions have already brought down Penn’s State organizational leadership and storied football program. Will the Nittany Lion’s devotion to a winning culture and Paterno’s subscription to resilience and ‘enduring adversity’ eventually parallel Enron’s obsession with profit at any cost and adherence to their former CEO’s ‘survival of the fittest’ principles?

The developing scandal emits conflicting emotions: I am torn by the outpouring of support for an 84-year-old legend who has earnestly dedicated himself to building a long tradition of winning with integrity without the infamous scandals often associated with a major college program. I am sad for these young, innocent boys who would not have experienced further horrors if someone in power had pushed the issue. Properly evaluating a rapidly developing news story is difficult; determining the relevant ethical considerations may represent the best next step i.e., the distinction between law and ethics, and the connection of responsibility to leadership.

Corporations like Enron were familiar with the law; they knew how to exploit and profit from it. University President Graham Spanier and Head Football Coach Joe Paterno met all legal requirements and will not be tried in a criminal court. The ethical question is whether they failed to meet their moral duties and obligations as human persons. Even more so—in their de facto roles as leaders, figureheads, and guardians in their community—greater responsibility is often associated with greater privilege. What personal responsibilities do individuals have beyond their specific job descriptions? Is an act of omission as heinous as the sin of commission?

The university has decided in the best interest of ‘business’ to relieve Spanier and Paterno of their responsibilities. Further clarity is needed before passing judgment on whether Penn State shares a similar aura of hubris with Enron. Even without the pride, their indecision produces greater consequences than even the dissolution of a major corporation.

In the business of uncovering the truth in the digital age, this game will have no winners. Prayers, comfort, and support to the victims and their families.

Human Sex Trafficking is Wrong

The proposition, “Torturing babies for fun is wrong” is often used in ethics courses to illustrate obvious examples of evil. Human sex trafficking should be added to this list as neither ethical expertise nor extended discussion is needed in passing judgment.

Human Sex Trafficking is the recruitment, transportation, or harboring of persons by threat, fraud, or abuse of power to achieve control over another for the purpose of sexual exploitation. Sex trafficking is no longer a crime just against the poor and marginalized. It has no respect for age, gender, race, class, or geographic boundary. In light of commercial exploitation, the victim’s consent is irrelevant.

Modern day trafficking−which includes forced labor, slavery, the removal of organs, and the sex trade−is big business. Cash for exploitation is the second largest illegitimate international activity with estimated total revenue between $5-$9 billion dollars (falling second only behind illegal drug distribution) and represents the fastest growing criminal industry in the world.

Business exploitation is often expressed through a sense of injustice in economic transactions, here exhibited by the systematic oppression found against helpless young women and innocent children and market-driven transactions of exploitation for cash. Profiteers from the sex trade and patronizers who fuel this exploitative industry represent the two halves of this problem. Supply side conditions will not significantly shift without a corresponding decrease in sexual demand.

Ultimately, while human sex trafficking masks itself as an economic transaction, it involves a deep violation and lack of respect for the dignity of the human spirit.

Film recommendation: Taken (2009)Trade (2007)

Postscript: Over $15,000 was raised July 24th, 2010 as ~ 150 North Orange / South L.A County residents participated on a 5K run/walk to build a sex trafficking refuge house in the Philippines. Support a safe haven.

The Defenders rode from Portland to Salem, OR on Saturday, October 2nd, 2010 to let legislators know that Oregonians care about protecting kids.

Elementary, My Dear Daughter

Our daughter’s summer birthdate forced us to choose whether to begin her educational career (kindergarten) a year earlier or later. I often lamented the ‘early entry’ decision over the years against my child’s objections that any delay would have given her a different set of unknown friends. I argued the extra year would have been better for her physical and emotional maturity.

Through much reflection and ribbing from my spouse, I now realize that the primary reason for waiting was so that I could have our daughter home with us one more year. While there is nothing wrong with this wish, it shows that the entire decision-making process needs more attention.

I wanted to delay the inevitable for these precious elementary school moments of time feel like sand slipping through my fingers.

The days are long but the years go by too fast.

Alex Kettles (former CRU Director, Oregon State University)

MTV’s Rev Run and Justine Simmons have encouraged families to save time by running their household like a business. Organizing the family according to a corporate model would pit our daughter as a stakeholder/employee having a compelling interest in the outcome and her parents as corporate executives. The kindergarten teacher acts as a mid-level manager as we concurrently are tax-paying shareholders of the public school system.

Current stakeholder theory holds that we have a morally significant non-fiduciary relationship with our daughter and that we should consider her needs (e.g. personality type, educational style, teacher qualifications, institutional quality, etc.) as well as our own. Our fiduciary interest demands proper consideration but pales in comparison. Holding my daughter back a year may make her more competitive in the marketplace or as a prospective college student in 12 years but the shareholder thesis that our primary social responsibility in our ‘familial’ corporation is to increase profits (à la an academic scholarship) seems relatively shortsighted.

As a parent or any leader in an organization, some decisions cater to other’s needs; many revolve around our own interests. Surfacing the multiple motivations behind a decision requires time. Despite the inevitable conflict, life often demands an immediate response and does not wait for an all-things-considered thoughtful reply. Fortunately, these crucial relationships are not about getting the correct answers but of managing the competing interests of all parties by asking the right questions about our motivations. Achieving this balance is not simple and may not be possible. Yet considering the various needs of stakeholders ultimately represents a fundamental elementary starting point in organizational management.

Film Recommendations: College Road Trip (2008); Father of the Bride (1991)